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to defend this great nation. our soldiers today operate in a most uncertain and unpredictable environment. it is the most dynamic and unpredictable i have seen in my over 36 years of service. unlike post-conflict drawdowns, where we have a termination of conflict due to a police treaty or a political decline of a superpower, instead today we have 81,000 soldiers deployed, including 50,000 fighting in afghanistan, and thousands of others in kuwait, in the horn of africa. over 91,000 soldiers are stationed in over 160 countries. we have been in a continuous state of war in the last 12 years, the longest in our history. but today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the fiscal uncertainty resulting from a lack of predictability in the budget cycle, a series of continuing resolutions, a threat of sequestration hanging over our heads, our country's inability to put its fiscal house in order compromise is the full readiness of the joint force, army, and will impact our ability to provide our security to our nation. we have two problems as i sit here today. we have an
uncertain and unpredictable environment. it is the most dynamic and unpredictable i have seen in my over 36 years of service. unlike post-conflict drawdowns, where we have a termination of conflict due to a police treaty or a political decline of a superpower, instead today we have 81,000 soldiers deployed, including 50,000 fighting in afghanistan, and thousands of others in kuwait, in the horn of africa. over 91,000 soldiers are stationed in over 160 countries. we have been in a continuous state of war in the last 12 years, the longest in our history. but today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the fiscal uncertainty resulting from a lack of predictability in the budget cycle, a series of continuing resolutions, a threat of sequestration hanging over our heads, our country's inability to put its fiscal house in order compromise is the full readiness of the joint force, army, and will impact our ability to provide our security to our nation. we have two problems as i sit here today. we have an immediate problem in fiscal year 2013, which has about eight months
in this constrained budget environment. we must help ensure dhs become a better stewart of tax dollars. recommendations by today's witnesses will help us better understand the issues that dhs faces and identify ways to help dhs improve. i look forward to their testimony. the chairman bomb that recognize the ranking member of the subcommittee, for any statement he may have. >> thank you mr. chairman. it is a pleasure to be here. i welcome witnesses and members of the subcommittee. i am looking for to working with the chairman and a bipartisan and productive manner as we conduct oversight in the department of homeland's security and other security functions. it is apparent, having met with the chairman at length, that we see eye to eye on many issues related to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. i appreciate his collaboration as we move this important agenda for tweets this is our first subcommittee meeting at cannot think of a better issue to examine. the department of, security has one of the largest budget in the federal government. each year brings in $40 million in
of the commitment to our students of the social character development skills and save positive learning environment that fosters their success. each of us is here today because we are seeking answers. answers about how to address one of the largest impediment to achieving this goal. bullying. i would like to present you just a few steps, if that is okay. nearly half of middle school principals who participated in a national bullying survey indicated that this issue ranked as one of the top five challenges in their school. we are indeed making progress into dispelling the myth that bullying is merely a rite of passage. currently, 49 states have implemented anti-bullying politics. according to the national bullying survey, only one in six principals report that the number of bullying incidents has decreased significantly as a result of their bullying initiatives. despite our best efforts bullying continues to plague our students and we can have it in our schools. as educators and participants in today's summit, we are well aware that providing the skills and tools that promote safety and well-being a
, his assessment of the environment he have to work in, any significant transitions like an election, the other things like the fighting season he has to go through. all of that goes into his calculus to provide a range of options in terms of recommendations. as the leadership looks at it, they will consider other things. i have no idea of what exactly went into that calculus. >> i went to a deployment in new hampshire of a guard units that is going to afghanistan. one of the worries i have is that the numbers being floated by the administration on the follow on -- don't we have to worry about the protection of our own forces? >> that is one of the things our commanders have to take into consideration, whether they can provide adequate protection of their troops while conducting operations in the area. depending on what the specific missions earned they will be asked to do and how much of it they will be asked to do, when you factor in force protection and other things, that lays out what the commander thinks his requirements are. typically, he will present a range of options. >> we
advertising? with the most appropriate level and to a shrinking tobacco controlled environment? the we can effectively counter advertise to counteract the effect. thank you. [applause] >> we are going to switch from tobacco and alcohol. we will talk about restrictions and advertising to some degree. before we do that, alex, are you there? maybe he is not there. one of the point i wanted to raise -- specify nothing about advertising does not mean advertising not occur. right now, we have medical marijuana. there is no specification about advertising and lee have dispensaries that advertising in local newspapers. advertising occurs without any specifications with respect to limits or desires. but we think about marijuana policy, it is probably better to think in advance about what sort of advertising the want -- do you want consumers exposed to? not thinking about it means that it will happen regardless. alex, are you on? i think we lost alex. for the moment, we will see if we can get him back. >> i am back. >> great. terrific. no problem. we are ready to handed over to you. >> thank you. th
&a" with author amity shlaes. >> tomorrow, representatives of the defense industry, health care, and environment hold a news conference on how to stop sequestration. that is live at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span2. >> what you might expect from samsung, given the breadth of products we have, tablets, televisions, computers, one of the areas we are investing in is this multi-screen connectivity. we are already seeing consumers multi-tasking. your honor tv but you are also texting and your phone or looking at the internet and your tablet. how do we link those devices to each other? had we link them to the clout or the internet? one very good example is the galaxy camera. we launched the camera last year, and the camera is now built in with internet connectivity, so you can take photos where you go and instantly through a wireless network upload them to a website or social media service. it is bringing wireless connectivity to a camera. linking products like that, lincoln and to the internet and to each other, that is a big opportunity for us. >> the future of consumer technology with samsung vp for s
are not generally willing to pay for access to content. in a digital environment. they are interesting -- they are interested in supporting brands. i think they are interested and still willing to pay for experience. experiences are different than access. to be a little bit more precise about this, the old model used to be you give us $35 and we give you 20 issues of print. for a very long time, until the web and all the business models were disrupted. now, our model is you give us $35 and you get print but you also get our experiential products. it did -- the digital colom is all the things i was talking about before. unlimited access, commenting, several things in that list. you get access to subscriber- only events, which we are doing at least once a month in major cities and some secondary markets, ann arbor, austin, places where there are a lot of people interested in the type of journalism we do. whether or not that will be enough is an open question pri is certainly part of the trend where journalists are not just researching and writing. they are researching, writing, promoting
. it will need to be done in an environment where as we broaden the base, we both contribute to deficit reduction and hopefully are able to lower rates. on the business side, we have a contradiction in our fiscal tax system. our statutory rate is high. our effective rate is not as high. when you look at the united states against other countries, it the statutory rate makes the u.s. look unattractive compared to others. for individual firms, their average tax rate is much lower because of all of the complicated provisions that are part of the code now. it would be a challenge to take on those individual credit. there's no way way to bring the rate down. that is something i think we need to do to maintain competitiveness abroad. >> you still believe that going down the road we need to reduce that to get the rate down? >> i do. when one looks at a table of international tax rates, it stands up at u.s. statutory rate is high. it is a complicated story to tell that the average rate is lower. it does not affect all businesses equally. we need a simpler tax code. >> could you briefly comment on somethin
on retirement, security, the environment, homeland security, minority health and health disparities and he is been a consist president supporter of the national institute of health and our mission and the work we do. he was elected to the senate in 2006 where he currently serves on the finances, public relations and business committees. he serves as co-chair on the security commission in europe. prior to this he represented mary mayor's third congressional district in the house of representatives. and before that in the maryland house of delegates where he served from 1967 to 1978. he was speaker. >> he is a champion for medical research support for maryland's world class university hopkins university of maryland and several others. and he is a strong supporter of our state's biotech industry which is not located here by chance. he's also been i think a strong supporter throughout all of this as the importance of looking for curious for many diseases and protect our citizens from bioattacks. >> he's been here in a town meeting. we arrive here today at a particularly interesting moment give
what it is like to be a policy maker trying to do different things in a partisan environment that have come to make the case why the fiscal challenges are so pressing. it is still import we were to come with a comprehensive plan to address them. campaign to fix the debt has been around for not very long but has amassed a tremendous group of support. from citizens across the country where we have 350,000 citizens to have joined the campaign, a present in 50 states, active organizations in 23 states in growing, partnerships with 205,000 small businesses. , and organizations all coming together in a way the country has to to explain why making tough choices of putting in place the policies that were required to get a hold of our nation's fiscal challenges is so important. i am proud to be joined by this tremendous group of former members of congress. i am going to turn it over to one of our three cochairs. do you have senator judd gregg and a few other people representing this new council. thank you very much. >> it is a pleasure to be here was so many of my former colleagues to serve thi
and this disparity indeed may grow in a resource constrained environment. these challenges combined with these destabilizing effects of terrorist and critical networks will make general rodriquez' task at africom among the most complicated in the department. an additional matter in the africom aor is committee watches osely is the ongoing u.s. support operationsin central africa to assist the multinational effort to remove joseph kony and his top lieutenants from the battlefield. this committee and general inhofe has been very active in this effort and assad to ensure that this mission is adequately resourced including additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. general rodriquez i know you are familiar with this mission and the committee looks forward to hearing from you about it and to working with you on it and so many of the other challenges he will be facing. i'm going to turn the gavel over to senator kaine who has agreed to take over because i must go to the floor and i i will call upon the senator inhofe. >> thank you mr. mr. mr. chair i join you in
that unusual nature and your own background as if they seek to alter the environment. >> as you said, is to find a bit differently than combatant commands and has more agency people assigned to head orders may think all of that is a great benet to the organization who stretches and reaches across the agency in an effort that is required to be done that way in that interagency effort. in the building partner capacity piece, as all of our operations there really is a one to general austin is talking about is helping to build the capacity of the nation to protect itself and provides stability for itself. so we worked hard over the years and we both had significant experience trying to build iraqi security forces as well as active dirty forces to do it themselves and also to work also to work with the multinational partners to also ensure they are part of the solution, both in our nato allies and allies throughout the world as well as the host nation countries. i look forward to continue that to help africans compare themselves to take care of themselves. >> some of the most challenging
would land. we focused on those environments because the trajectory was that you could land in the desert or the jungle. so we did that. we also did a lot of geology training. i don't recall any training that we did that i felt in the end was worthless that we wasted our time. we did thousands of hours in the simulator, learning how to fly. we did a lot of geology, i probably got a masters degree in geology during my six years of training. the training was very thorough on apollo and we felt well prepared. >> we have time for one more question. way out in the back there. >> hi. i'm a student member of the explorer's club. you mentioned being on the backside of the moon alone would have been a strange experience. i want to know if space exploration is part of the human experience or is it more of a technical kind of quest. when you were on the moon or on your way to the moon, did you feel more human, less human or just the right amount of human? and what is your favorite sci fi movie? >> it was a human, experience. in fact, there is an exhibition -- exhibit touring with nasa
that shop. it helps them and it helps the environment and the town center. i think some of the things of importance is are interesting but you have to believe that government, local governments and national governments have a role to play, a partnership with the private sector to make things happen. we used to have that across the country with other agencies that would partner together. a lot of important things done in town centers. that got ripped up two years ago. we need a strategy but we need immediate action as well. >> let's keep going. >> do you think -- lloyd con away. i work in sports. do you think that sports education is important in the development of young people and the development of the economy? >> i absolutely do. the olympic games was a fantastic moment for britain. i think the work that needs to be done is not just inspire the young generation but make sure we deliver on the promise of the generation and the next generation. i think we have some distance to go to make that happen, frankly. i think a good thing is the school's partnership of those but i think they h
development program and the environment. >> my friend speaks very knowledgeably about this. these are going to be extremely difficult negotiations. obviously, our aim is for the significant cut i have spoken about. the point about agriculture is important, particularly the flexibility we require to make sure things can continue to succeed. >> we know the prime minister has met lots of millionaires, but has he ever met anyone who will lose their income -- home because of this bedroom tax? >> i hold constituency surgeries -- surveys and listen to all the cases the leader of the opposition has brought up today. i have many forces who live in my constituency. what they say to me is that they want a government who is on the side of the people who will work hard and do the right thing. they support the fact that we are capping welfare, getting on top of immigration and clearing up the mess left by the other party. >> today is the united nations international day of zero tolerance to female genital mutilation. does the prime minister agree that britain should be doing all it can to combat this dre
for the environment schemes that they put in place. let me deal with each of those points. the section of the budget that includes spending on research, innovation and university funding is up by over a third. the money is handed out on the basis of quality, so britain's universities are particularly well placed to benefit. we have ensured that structural funds will continue to flow to our less well-off regions, and britain's share will remain broadly the same, at around 11 billion. while we have cut spending on the common agricultural policy overall, we have protected the flexibility that will allow us to direct funds to support both the environment and the livelihoods of our farming communities. overall, this is a better-framed budget in terms of growth, jobs and competitiveness. it is disappointing that administrative costs are still around 6% of the total, but overall spending on the cap will fall by 13% compared with the last seven-year budget. research and development, and other pro-growth investment, will now account for 13% rather than 9% of the total budget. reform of eu spending is a long-
for environment, food and rural affairs has led these meetings with retailers and producers. we have agreed a tougher inspection regime, and have asked hospitals, schools and prisons to check with their suppliers that they are testing their products. as the honorable gentleman and the house know, yesterday the police and the fsa raided two premises, one in west yorkshire, the other in west wales, and as he said, if there has been criminal activity, there should be the full intervention of the law. we have also asked for meaningful tests from retailers and producers, and those will be published in full. he is right to say what he does. >> in a week when both sides of the house have celebrated the wonders of the united kingdom, i am delighted to discover that i now represent a midlands constituency. will the prime minister please join in celebrating a culture that touches both sides of the english-scottish border by celebrating cumbria day with us today? >> i am very much looking forward to joining my honorable friend at the celebration of cumbria day here in the house of commons. he is incre
environment. here we go. thank you. here are some trends i see and how citizen as united plays into them. it did not cause them but it greases the wheels, especially since 2000 to when congress passed the bi-partisan campaign reform act. there is a redistribution of money away from can't attend toward groups. candidates are chiefly responsible but more is spent by others and for a while was political parties but it is non- party groups and citizens united cracked up this dynamic. there are strong incentives for collective action by partisans. national politics today is about high-stakes elections. both parties have a chance to control government and have very different views about what should be done. because of this, parses want to organize and coordinate but campaign finance laws but restraint of that. laws were designed during canada-centered elections and parties to an answer that much. we did it matter that much. we knew where the money was coming from. now we have super pacs and there is a severe mismatch between a high stakes system an old- fashioned laws that force money outside
with families, to life to changes in one's and environment, and to deal with adversity. just think about that. being productive, developing positive relationships with others, adapting to change, like adolescents, for example, dealing with adversity. we saw 30% rate of depression in new orleans after hurricane katrina. so mental health is being able to deal with these life challenges and circumstances and to be productive. it should follow then that mental disorder, mental illness represents alterations in those mental functions such that one is able to carry them out because the mood disorders, thinking disorders, were behavioral disorders. so mental disorders follow immediately from the definition of mental health. i do not want you to take your mental health for granted, because that is what we do. we take our known health for granted, and so therefore, we are not sympathetic when people have mental illnesses, because we have not thought about the fact we could lose it. we do not want to take our mental health for granted. there were five key messages in the surgeon general's report that c
government creates jobs, but i do believe it's our role to create an environment that encourages investment. jobs are created when people are willing to risk capital. we want tennessee to be as low of a risk as possible. to provide certainty to businesses, we overhauled our tort laws. to build on those efforts, this year we're proposing legislation to reform our worker's compensation laws. during my first year in office, i held business roundtables across the state where we heard from businesses over and over that worker's comp is an issue in tennessee. we spent last year working with stakeholders to find ways to improve our system with a focus on fairness to both the employee and employer, and we believe the worker's comp bill we're proposing does just that. there are a lot of reasons for people to come to our state. from blues on beale street to racing in bristol; from dollywood and the great smoky mountain national park, to market square in knoxville, to the chattanooga aquarium, to the grand ole opry in nashville and thousands of places in between. in tennessee, tourism equals jobs. [ap
environments for young people and their families where they feel comfortable asking for help. i am counting on america's doctors to help lead his conversations. the care you provide for your patience will always be your first job. today, there are many other ways for doctors to make a difference in peoples lives lives. starting with contributing to the transformation of our health care system. we have made great progress in the last few years. i look forward to working on that progress and creating a health system that patients vomit doctors, and this country deserve. thank you all for what you do every day. [applause]>> today, rhode island senator sheldon whitehouse, author and former white house advisor, and representatives from the sierra club will be among the speakers at the forward on climate rally. coverage beginning at noon eastern here on c-span. >> i think the women themselves in many cases, were interested in politics but had no vehicle to express that in their own lives. they were attracted to men who were going to become politically active or were already politically after if -
.a. it is in orange county. it is a changing environment, but it is a wealthy, somewhat conservative community. one of the challenges i had was to make the library in a national institution while still respectful of local customs and that was not easy. >> so the foundation, the chairman is still ron walker. how would you describe -- you were very controversial you were about as controversial as any director. >> this is what -- i promised -- if you look at what i said from the beginning, from 2006 when the national archives hired me to do this, i was very straightforward about what i was going to do. so there is no debate in switching. the archives came to me. but it was a very interesting conflict of different events because the head of the nixon foundation at that point was john taylor, rev. john taylor. and john taylor is an intellectual. he is very complicated. he is a bit torn about nixon. and he admired nixon's mind. and he wanted nixon's library to be credible. now, i don't believe that every member of the nixon foundation shared john's intellectual goal. he really wanted the cold war histori
% of business owners that were surveyed identified the current environment as a bad time to expand and political uncertainty topped the list for the reasons not to attempt economic growth. lee, a resident of muskogee, oklahoma, and president of acme corporation, said a lot of small businesses had to go in debt to stay afloat. he said now they can't make the money they need to to pay down debts due in large part the environment the government has created. i joined a small group of members in congress. i have faced unprecedented difficulties ensuring my business succeeded. i step on the floor of the united states house of representatives with a firsthand understanding how high the hurdles are for a business to succeed and just simply jump over. last month when president obama was sworn into his second term, i was reminded of something he said four years ago in his first inauguration. the president said, "the question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small but whether it works, whether it helps families finds a job at a decent wage, care they can afford or retirement tha
between our environment and our economy. that really hit home for latinos and for all of us. carbon pollutions from the dirty power plants and saying no to the keystone and tar sands pipeline. [applause] president obama's legacy, his response, his resolve in responding to the climate crisis. the zero oil industry claims that the keystone pipeline is for our energy security. we know that this pipeline is the industry new access to foreign markets and the ability to sell their tar sands from more money. it is win-win for them. what about us? what about ensuring we have what we need to make sure our families have economic security and health security? it's a lot for all of us when it comes to clean air and clean water in our climate. we also keep hearing about these job killing regulations. for millions of americans, especially minority and low-income communities, clean air protections are lifesaving regulations. this is another big reason why environmental issues are registering on the mind of some and a latino families today. we and unequivocal support lowering the pollution from pow
they are supportive of them controlled than they were back in december of 1993. even the environment looks different. even more important than that, it is really that moderate seat held by democrats do not belong to democrats any more. do belong to very conservative republicans. seats that were held by moderate republicans are now held by democrats. that makes the democrats all that much -- that makes the dynamic all that more problematic. if you are a gun owner that it's a certain democratic profile, that makes it more likely that you are actually eight republicans. host: host: you wrote about this. ece. is amy's pi guest: we still have to do it immigration reform. host: biscuit the viewer is involved -- let's get the viewers involved. caller: we should be able to vote on our own gun control and immigration policies. host: what do you mean by that? caller: you can vote whether you want immigration control, yes or no. enforce our laws we already have. the american people can vote. the details can be worked out by congress. host: do you think the electorate moves forward on these issues by voting for
of 43% trust republicans with gun policy. on the issue of the environment, 55% trust president obama more. foreign policy, it is 51% to 37%. theresa, nevada. caller: regarding president obama using executive orders to go around the republicans in the house, i am all for it. i am aware that this is a two- party democracy and we need republicans to be reasonable working party, but they have not been. the president has no choice but to go around them. john boehner has walked away. i am frustrated and the country is frustrated, other democrats are frustrated and scared. i am scared of the things they're willing to do to our country. he is doing what he has to do. i am all for his proposals, all for clean energy and comprehensive immigration, i am for gun legislation. i am for all of them. i am center-left, that is progressive. i think the country is definitely going progressive. i do not understand where the republicans want to obstruct and go with their small mindedness and small government proposals that they think that they can push through on the american people that i do not think a
be a virtuous cycle, it saves tax dollars, improves the environment, reduces the damage from flooding, and all the attendant costs. it's a class eck example of what the federal government should learn from 200 years of experience trying to engineer the mississippi river and instead allowing some cases nature to take its course and avoid more expensive and worse damage. and this is what we need to do across the federal government. we don't have to spend twice as much money on health care as most of the developed countries for outcomes that are mediocre at best. we don't have to spend more money on defense than 12 or 13 of the remaining largest defense budgets, and on weapons that in many cases like our nuclear arsenal, but we have far more than we need and can ever use and can afford. we can pare that down, save tens of millions of dollars and still be the most powerful nation in the world. for the outrageous crop insurance that encourages reckless and expensive behavior by paying farmers to plant crops on land that never should have been cultivated in the first place. while we will control spe
environment that would get the economy growing. if you want wages to grow -- what we've done to the middle class has been devastating. immigration will be one thing we will hopefully get to an honest understanding of the policy and the facts. you opened with a comment about the president's administration. a friend of mine admits the president that promise to be the most transparent and open to not turn out that way. i have not heard members of the left just being brutal, "you promised open government and sunlight into the workings and you did just the opposite." this is an interesting conversation. the left was brutal to the previous administration on guantanamo bay, extradition, the use of drones. that same left is almost mute when this president has gone further and broken his promises. host: speaker boehner held a press conference yesterday and said the house would not pass any sequester bills until the senate does. the speaker was tired of having legislation die. guest: we have spent two years negotiating with ourselves. we sit there and wait for the president to deliver an honest budg
learning environment every single day. [applause] michele and i remember how tough it can be to find good child care. i remember how expensive it can be, too. the size of your paycheck should not determine your child's future. [applause] sure none of our kids start out already a step behind. let's make it a national priority to give every child access to a high-quality, early education. let's give our kids that chance. i do have to warn the parents here who have young kids, they grow up to be 5 foot 10 inches, and even if they are nice to you, they basically do not have a lot of time for you on the weekends. [laughter] they have sleepovers and dates. [laughter] so, all that early investment just leads them to go away. [laughter] now, what i also said on tuesday night is that our commitment to orchids' education has to continue throughout their academic lives. from the time our kids start grade school, we need to equip them with the skills they need in a high-tech economy. we are working to recruit and train 100,000 new teachers in the fields of the future, science, technology, engineering
in a hollow army. today, the global environment is the most uncertain i've seen in my 36 years of service. it is unpredictable and dynamic. we simply don't know when we will have to deploy soldiers to fight again. but history tells us that we will. we owe it to them to ensure they sister the proper resources to be ready when needed. the fiscal outlook with the u.s. army faces in fiscal year 2013 is dire and to my knowledge, unprecedented. in addition to the cuts to the army lev vied by the budget control act of 2011 the combination of the continuing resolution, a shortfall -- excuse me a shortfall in oversees in funds for afghanistan and sequester in fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a $17-$18 billion shortfall to the military's operation accounts. as well as $6 billion cuts to other programs. all of this will come in the remaining seven months of this yeared the fiscal year 2013 situation will have impacts of readiness on all forces not serving afghanistan and forward in korea. impacts that will have a significant impact well into fiscal year 2014 and beyond. just a few actions we will be
to be able to move quickly in this environment. a lot of what's happening here has been driven by changes in technology. those changes in technology are going to continue to occur. and at a rapid rate. they need the flexibility to do that. they need to have an accountability and oversight structure as well to be able to provide the necessary accountability and authority. >> my time's about up. i want to say this for the record. i don't think anybody has a lot tougher job than what the postmaster general has. and the fact is that the post office is in trouble and i congratulate you. there's really 536 postmaster generals, unfortunately, and the goal of our reform ought to be that there's one. that we give you the flexibility to do the service to keep the standards there and have a system that offers the best service at the best price with the best quality the country can have. i know a lot of things you have done are controversial. but leadership's about leading. and i want to congratulate you for having led. thank you. >> thank you. >> i approve that message. >> senator, you're next. >> t
families, strengthening the middle class. he knew that the future is about protecting our environment and preserving our planet for generations to come. john knew that the future of the house is strengthened by fellow staff members working in a bipartisan way. john has always respected the role -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman will suspend. the house is not in order. the gentlewoman may continue. ms. pelosi: thank you, madam speaker. john has always respected the role-played by our staff on the education committee and on the natural resources committee and the offices of the democratic leader and as my role as speaker of the house and as our distinguished speaker's role as speaker today. indeed, the staff look to him for leadership just as members look to him for guidance. in that spirit, this afternoon, my colleagues the speaker, thank you, mr. speaker, for making this possible, the speaker and i will honor john lawrence with theon w. mccormack award of excellence on which as declared by former majority leader, then majority leader carl albert in 1970, quote, the name of t
-quality learning environment every single day. [applause] michele and i remember how tough it can be to find good child care. i remember how expensive it can be, too. the size of your paycheck should not determine your child's future. [applause] let's make sure none of our kids start out already a step behind. let's make it a national priority to give every child access to a high-quality, early education. let's give our kids that chance. i do have to warn the parents here who have young kids, they grow up to be 5 foot 10 inches, and even if they are nice to you, they basically do not have a lot of time for you on the weekends. [laughter] they have sleepovers and dates. [laughter] so, all that early investment just leads them to go away. [laughter] now, what i also said on tuesday night is that our commitment to our kids' education has to continue throughout their academic lives. from the time our kids start grade school, we need to equip them with the skills they need in a high-tech economy. we are working to recruit and train 100,000 new teachers in the fields of the future, science, technology,
interest-rate environment. i think everybody agrees that we are in in a low interest-rate environment. if we are, it is not $16 billion negative, it is $31 billion negative. the last recession ended in mid-2009. it does not feel like it ended, but officially, that is when it ended. fha is very vulnerable to a recession, as the chairman said at the beginning. very vulnerable. if there were to be a recession , anytime in the next years, just a normal recession, fha would suffer how distraught the glosses and the taxpayer would be at risk. but only today have all these negative economic values, then they run into some additional losses that they never projected. >> thank you. >> i'm of the gentle lady has expired. we now recognize the gentleman from california. five minutes. >> thank you. the fha may have mispriced risk, but i will point out the private sector did worse. s&p stood as the crown jewel of the private sector's ability to price risk. they are in the business of telling everybody else in the private sector what the risk was. now, a judge or jury will determine only the simple
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)